Red Flowers and More

Oh yeah, I forgot.

Out of bloom out of mind, I guess.

I also forgot about the blue flowered Salvia gaurenetica, the dark purple May Night salvias, and the red flowered fire spike and dwarf bottlebrush. And so, and I say this full aware of the absurdity of it, the ONLY flower color I don’t actually have in the back garden as I was talking about on the last post is peach. Peach… literally one of my favorite flower colors. Sigh. What ya gonna do, man. What ya gonna do.

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Life off the “Urban Homestead”in Texas and Air Travel in a Time of Coronavirus

Whelp.

Yeah.

You know my old soapbox about staying home and staying safe? I still feel that, deeply. But considering I just flew to and from Florida for work means there should be a big ol’ hypocrisy asterisk  on the side of said soapbox.

In my defense this was a required onsite for me to test out my product on a massive construction project north of Tampa.

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A Good Friday and Other Goings On

We are very lucky.

We have a yard to get out in and good weather, good health, and both my husband and I are still employed. The children are doing well and adjusting nicely to this learn-from-home scenario. The baby chicks are still all going strong. Marital bliss prevails. We have a well stocked fridge and pantry. And we have masks provided by our talented neighbor who sews.

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Texas Garden in March and the Pandemic

You’ll forgive me for the unoriginal blog title, I’m still a little foggy-headed over here. I’ve been sick for a week, thereabout.

Last Thursday I cancelled a work trip to Florida on the day I was supposed to go since I woke up with a fever and cough and an insanely painful sore throat. Went to the doctor, no strep, no flu, and was told “even if we wanted to test you for coronavirus we couldn’t” since there were no tests available. Cool.

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